Is it Anxiety or Anxcitement?

You just booked that vacation you’ve been dreaming of. It’s three months away. 

You wake up in the middle of the night with your stomach feeling a bit tight or queasy or Anxious Womaneven like you might throw up.

Your head may be achy or even pounding. You feel like you can’t breathe.

SOMETHINGS WRONG, something in you screams.

Unable to sleep, you try to decide if you should grab the Xanax. You look at the clock. It’s 4:00am. If you take a pill now, you’ll be groggy in the morning.

You lay there looking at the ceiling, wondering if this vacation was a mistake. The bogeyman in your head is asking:

Can you really afford it? Can you be off work at that time? It’s right near the implementation of your big project. Oh my God, you think, the airfare is non-refundable.

It’s official. You are having a full blown anxiety attack.

Your brain is no longer yours. It has given itself over to fear, apprehension, and worry. Like a cowboy on a bucking bronco, all you can do is hold on for dear life.

Yet, some fearless part of you is also yelling, VACATION, VACATION, THE OCEAN, Yes....PALM TREES, TROPICAL DRINKS SERVED IN CUTE LITTLE GLASSES. NO WORRIES FOR EIGHT DAYS AND SEVEN NIGHTS. OH, MY GOD.

You’re not having an anxiety attack; you’re having an anxcitement attack; that little emotional space between excitement and fear that every young child experiences as a natural part of life. It’s only grown-ups that call it anxiety.

You can lay there listening to the bogeyman or you can tell him/her: “Look, you don’t have to go on this vacation with me. I’d be happy to leave you at home.”

Less Than Helpful Advice

Anxcitement attacks are brought on by many things: a sudden change, happiness, uncertainty, something new, failure, success, just about anything that upsets our comfortable business-as-usual.

Happy woman on beachYou can choose to hear your anxiety or your excitement.

 

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About almondhead

I am a mental health counselor in private practice. One of the focuses of my practice is helping people with fear, anxiety and their ugly stepsister, depression. I became a counselor after a long career in the technology world, so naturally, I think of the brain as an engineering problem. It can help to understand something about how the brain works. I decided to start this blog as a way to help other people learn about fear, anxiety and relationship. (All our problems are really about relationships.) You can also find me at: www.virtuallyfearless.com www.PsychologyToday.com www.theravive.com http://www.marriagefriendlytherapists.com/
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